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Energy Rebates and Tax Credits are Available

 

Let's Shew's Top Quality assist you in obtaining the most fo the substantial energy Rebates and Tax Credits that are available for your energy saving projects, e.g., windows, etc.

 

Please call us and below is more information about these programs:

 

 

Hail Storm Damage Tips

 

You know what storm damage looks like. After all, most storms leave plenty of visible evidence behind. Once the leaves are raked and the fallen branches are on the curb, it’s over with.

 

The process of detecting and evaluating hail damage is subjective at best, and often everyone involved will offer a different assessment. Damage can range from large, highly visible dents and tears to almost undetectable indentations or invisible granule damage. However, even small amounts of damage can harm the surfacing material, leading to deterioration of the shingles months later.

 

Normally, if a shingle indicates outward damage, the underlying components may be compromised and affected to some degree. On damaged roofs, the hail impact may affect the embedment of the granular surfacing in the asphalt top coating. This loosens the granules, potentially allowing the granules to separate from the coating layer and wash off the roof. Without the granule surfacing, the asphalt top coating is exposed to ultraviolet radiation from ordinary sunlight and will eventually deteriorate, exposing the fiberglass substrate and creating the potential for a leak.

 

On severe hail damage, the fiberglass substrate may be physically broken further, compromising the weather integrity of the shingle.  Without visible damage, there is no real way to be sure how much damage shingles have encountered. Outward damage may not appear until months or years later.  In accordance with the terms of the Limited Warranty, there is no coverage for damage caused by hail.  However, should the shingles be damaged by hail, there is continuing coverage for manufacturing defects.  There is a definite distinction between a manufacturing defect and damage caused by hail.  When evaluating hail damage, look for the following conditions:

 

  • Tears in the Shingle – Tears are normally worse on re-roofs due to the irregular surface support. The main areas showing damage usually include hips, ridges, sides of dragon’s teeth, and butt edges of shingles.​

  • Indentations in the Shingle – Indentations will be either round or half-moon shaped. Some damage may not be visible and will require you to feel for any indentations or to break the bonds of the shingle and feel the backside for any irregularities.

 

Remember, if you live in the Tulsa Metro area or in Green Country, at Shew’s we provide 24/7 Emergency Service (918) 266-7946.  We will be glad to do a complete 17 point inspection of your home to help you determine the extent of damage your home may have sustained.  Our estimates to repair damage are NO CHARGE and there is NO Obligation.

 

If you are not sure about the status of your home's exterior, feel free to give us a call at 918-266-7946 or contact us via e-mail see the Contact Us page. We are fully insured and prepared to assist you in any manner you desire.

 

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Natural Enemies to Roofs

 

Sun, rain, wind, and cold — a roof system’s performance is affected by much of what nature throws at it. Knowing about these and other factors will help you make informed roof system buying decisions:

 

 

Sun

Heat and ultraviolet rays cause roofing materials to deteriorate over time. Deterioration can occur faster on the sides facing west or south.

 

Rain

When water gets underneath shingles, shakes or other roofing materials, it can work its way to the roof deck and cause the roof structure to rot. Extra moisture encourages mildew and rot elsewhere in a house, including walls, ceilings, insulation, and electrical systems.

 

Wind

High winds can lift shingles’ edges (or other roofing materials) and force water and debris underneath them. Extremely high winds can cause extensive damage.

 

Thermal Shock

Thermal shock is the expansion and contraction of the roof system due to extreme temperature changes.

 

Condensation

Condensation can result from the buildup of relatively warm, moisture-laden air. Moisture in a poorly ventilated attic promotes decay of wood sheathing and rafters, possibly destroying a roof structure. Sufficient attic ventilation can be achieved by installing larger or additional vents and will help alleviate problems because the attic air temperature will be closer to the outside air temperature.

 

Ice Dam

An ice dam is a ridge of ice that forms at the lower edge of a roof and prevents water produced by melting snow from draining off the roof. The water that backs up behind the dam can leak into a building and cause damage to walls, ceilings, insulation, and other areas.

 

The snow on a roof surface that is above 32 degrees F will melt. As water flows down the roof, it reaches the portion of the roof that is below 32 degrees F and freezes. This creates an ice dam.

 

The dam grows as it is fed by the melting snow above it, but it will limit itself to the portions of the roof that are, on the average, below 32 degrees F. So the water above backs up behind the ice dam and remains a liquid. This water finds cracks and openings in the exterior roof covering and flows into the attic space. In the most common case, the water simply backs up and flows under the shingles. From the attic, it could move into exterior walls or through the ceiling insulation and stain the ceiling finish.

 

For a roof to last, your Roofing System must include protection from ice dams and wind-driven rain. This is accomplished by installing waterproofing underlayment directly beneath the shingles.

 

In addition to protecting the roof deck from damage from ice dams and wind-driven rain, Ice and Water Shield should be used on areas of the roof where water has a tendency to collect or flow. Valleys, vents, chimneys, and skylights are examples of spots where waterproofing underlayment should be considered.

 

Moss & Algae

Moss can grow on moist wood shingles and shakes. Once it grows, moss holds even more moisture to a roof system’s surface, causing rot. In addition, moss roots also can work their way into a wood deck and structure. Algae also grows in damp, shaded areas on wood or asphalt shingle roof systems. Besides creating a black-green stain, algae can retain moisture, causing rot and deterioration. Trees and bushes should be trimmed away from homes and buildings to eliminate damp, shaded areas, and gutters should be kept clean to ensure good drainage.

 

Trees & Leaves

Tree branches touching a roof will scratch and gouge roofing materials when the branches are blown by the wind. Falling branches from overhanging trees can damage, or even puncture, shingles and other roofing materials. Leaves on a roof system’s surface retain moisture and cause rot, and leaves in the gutters block drainage.

 

Missing or Torn Shingles

The key to a roof system’s effectiveness is complete protection. When shingles are missing or torn off, a roof structure and home or building interior are vulnerable to water damage and rot. The problem is likely to spread-nearby shingles also are ripped easily or blown away. Missing or torn shingles should be replaced as soon as possible.

 

Shingle Deterioration

When shingles are old and worn out, they curl, split and lose their waterproofing effectiveness. Weakened shingles easily are blown off, torn or lifted by wind gusts. The end result is structural rot and interior damage. A deteriorated roof system only gets worse with time, it should be replaced as soon as possible.

 

Flashing Deterioration

Many apparent roof leaks really are flashing leaks. Without good, tight flashings around chimneys, vents, skylights and wall/roof junctions, water can enter a home or building and cause damage to walls, ceilings, insulation, and electrical systems. Flashings should be checked as part of a biannual roof inspection and gutter cleaning.

 

Ventilation and Insulation Are Key

 One of the most critical factors in roof system durability is proper ventilation. Without it, heat and moisture build-up in an attic area and combine to cause rafters and sheathing to rot, shingles to buckle, and insulation to lose its effectiveness.  Therefore, it is important to never block off sources of roof ventilation, such as louvers, ridge vents or soffit vents, even in winter. Proper attic ventilation will help prevent structural damage caused by moisture, increase roofing material life, reduce energy consumption and enhance the comfort level of the rooms below the attic.

 

Proper Ventilation is Essential

 

Ventilation is one of the most asked about topics here at Shew’s Top Quality Roofing and Guttering. With our Oklahoma Summer heat, homeowners are looking for ways to reduce summer cooling bills. And proper ventilation in the winter months is just as important. Attic Ventilation is a process of air intake and output. The flow of air is critical to promote good ventilation. As illustrated below, air movement is essential!

 

Below are just a few of the commonly used ventilation systems used by Shew’s Top Quality Roofing and Guttering in the Tulsa Metro and Green Country Areas.

 

Types of Roof/Attic Venting

     

Whirlybird

The “Whirlybird” is a good product for promoting air circulation. This ventilation system evacuates large volumes of air as it spins. The shape and design of this vent actually pulls air from the attic. There are moving parts and bearings in the Whirlybird, but it is fairly inexpensive and provides good ventilation.

Ridge Vent

Installed at the peaks of the roof, this product allows for added efficiency at the highest point in the attic where hot air tends to become trapped. Ridge vent is popular because it is barely visible after installation, removes the hot, trapped air in the highest attic areas, has no moving parts, and gives the ridges of the roof a unique look.

Power Vent

Power roof mount attic ventilators feature a factory pre-wired combination automatic thermostat/humidistat. The thermostat/humidistat is in the same housing for an easy, single electric hookup. The thermostat monitors the attic for costly heat buildup in warmer months and the humidistat monitors the attic for damaging moisture buildup for year-round protection.  Solar-powered power vents are available as well.

 

A power vent can move up to 1500 CFM, cooling attics up to 2100 square feet and requires at least 5.0 square feet of intake vents.

Low Profile & Box Vents

The Low Profile and Box vents are static roof vents.  That means they have no moving parts. Most homes have these vents.

Helpful Building and Roofing Terms

 

  • Deck/Sheathing - The surface, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), to which roofing materials are applied.

  • Dormer - A small structure projecting from a sloped roof, usually with a window.

  • Drip edge - An L-shaped strip (usually metal) installed along roof edges to allow water run-off to drip clear of the deck, eaves, and siding.

  • Eave - The horizontal lower edge of a sloped roof.

  • Fascia - A flat board, band or face located at a cornice’s outer edge.

  • Felt/Underlayment - A sheet of asphalt-saturated material (often called tar paper) used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

  • Fire rating - System for classifying the fire resistance of various materials. Roofing materials are rated Class A, B or C, with Class A materials having the highest resistance to fire originating outside the structure.

  • Flashing - Pieces of metal used to prevent the seepage of water around any intersection or projection in a roof system, such as vent pipes, chimneys, valleys and joints at vertical walls.

  • Louvers - Slatted devices installed in a gable or soffit (the underside of eaves) to ventilate the space below a roof deck and equalize air temperature and moisture.

  • Oriented strand board (OSB) - Roof deck panels (4 by 8 feet) made of narrow bits of wood, installed lengthwise and crosswise in layers, and held together with a resin glue. OSB often is used as a substitute for plywood sheets.

  • Penetrations - Vents, pipes, stacks, chimneys-anything that penetrates a roof deck.

  • Rafters - The supporting framing to which a roof deck is attached.

  • Rake - The inclined edge of a roof over a wall.

  • Ridge - The top edge of two intersecting sloping roof surfaces.

  • Sheathing - The boards or sheet materials that are fastened to rafters to cover a house or building.

  • Slope - Measured by rise in inches for each 12 inches of horizontal run A roof with a 4-in-12 slope rises 4 inches for every foot of horizontal distance.

  • Square - The common measurement for roof area. One square is 100 square feet (10 by 10 feet).

  • Truss - Engineered components that supplement rafters in many newer homes and buildings. Trusses are designed for specific applications and cannot be cut or altered.

  • Valley - The angle formed at the intersection of two sloping roof surfaces.

  • Vapor retarder - A material designed to restrict the passage of water vapor through a roof system or wall.

 

Windows – Helpful Q&A

 

What causes condensation on windows?

 

Condensation, or “sweating,” is a natural occurrence on all windows and is caused by excess humidity, or invisible water vapor, present in the air. When this water vapor comes in contact with a surface which is at a cooler temperature, the vapor turns to visible droplets of moisture.

 

Our insulating glass units provide superior energy efficiency to reduce the potential for condensation. However, there is no such thing as a condensation-free window in high humidity conditions. Controlling the amount of moisture in your home is the most effective action you can take to avoid condensation.

 

Here are a few tips on reducing the moist air in your home:

  • Use fans in bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms to circulate the air.

  • Air out your home frequently by opening doors and windows.

  • Reduce the number of indoor house plants, as plants increase humidity levels.

  • Use a dehumidifier to remove excess humidity from the air.

 

How do vinyl windows compare with windows made from other materials, such as wood and aluminum?

 

The performance and longevity of vinyl windows compare very favorably to those of other building materials, and vinyl often costs less to produce. Vinyl windows and doors are rapidly capturing a major market share as more builders and homeowners learn about vinyl’s outstanding value and economy.

 

Long-lasting beauty, low maintenance, and excellent thermal efficiency ratings give vinyl windows a winning edge over other types of replacement windows. Today’s vinyl compound is produced with extra levels of UV inhibitors to help withstand harsh weather conditions, and it is recyclable and environmentally friendly. Vinyl won’t pit or peel over time with only simple care and cleaning, windows can keep their beautiful appearance for years to come.

 

How does insulating glass improve the quality of windows and doors?

 

Insulating glass improves the quality of windows and doors by:

  • Improving the performance of the U and R values of your new windows and doors

  • Reducing condensation

  • Helping keep the heat in and cold out during winter

  • Helping keep the heat out and the cold in during summer

 

What is Low E/Argon-filled glass, and how does it work?

 

Low E (Emissivity) Glass is glass with a transparent metallic oxide coating applied onto or into a glass surface. The coating allows short-wave energy to pass through but reflects long-wave infrared energy, improving the U-Value.

Argon Gas is an odorless, colorless, tasteless, non-toxic gas that is six times denser than air. It is used to replace air between the glass panes to reduce temperature transfer.

 

What are R-values and U-values?

R-value is the resistance a material has to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the resistance.

U-value is the amount of heat transferred through a material. The lower the U-value, the slower the rate of heat flow and the better the insulating quality.

 

 
 

Helpful Window Terms

 
  • Air Chambers – Small honeycomb spaces within the sash and frame which help to insulate and strengthen the window.

  • Air Infiltration – The amount of air that passes between a window sash and frame. In windows, it is measured in terms of cubic feet of air per minute, per square foot of area. The lower the number, the less air the window lets pass through.

  • Air Chambers – Small honeycomb spaces within the sash and frame which help to insulate and strengthen the window.

  • Air Infiltration – The amount of air that passes between a window sash and frame. In windows, it is measured in terms of cubic feet of air per minute, per square foot of area. The lower the number, the less air the window lets pass through.

  • Air Lok™ (Air Latch) – Latch mechanism on the interior face of the sash which retains the window in a partially open position for ventilation.

  • Angled Exterior – A sloped extension from the frame that adds an aesthetically-pleasing dimension to the exterior of the window.

  • Argon Gas – An odorless, colorless, tasteless, non-toxic gas which is six times denser than air. It is used to replace air between the glass panes to reduce temperature transfer.

  • Awning – A top-hinged window that swings outward for ventilation.

  • Bay Window – An angled combination of three windows that project out from the wall of the home. The windows are commonly joined at 30- or 45-degree angles.

  • Beveled Exterior – An angled extension from the frame that adds an aesthetically-pleasing dimension to the exterior of the window.

  • Bow Window – An angled combination of windows in 3-, 4- or 5-lite configurations. The windows are attached at 10-degree angles to project a more circular, arced appearance.

  • Cam Lock and Keeper – The mechanisms which pull the sash together when placed in the locked position.

  • Capillary Tubes – Small hollow tubes which penetrate the spacer system of an insulating glass unit. They allow pressure equalization between manufacturing locations, shipping, and installation locations. Since the insulating glass unit is not permanently sealed, the airspace cannot be filled with Argon gas.

  • Casement – A window with a side-hinged sash that opens outward for ventilation.

  • Celcon®Rollers– Self-lubricating rollers that are found in Slider windows and patio doors, that will not mar and are corrosion resistant.

  • Condensation Resistance Factor – A measure of the effectiveness of a window or glazing system to reduce the potential for condensation. The higher the condensation resistance factor, the more efficient the window and glazing system.

  • Conduction – Energy transfer from one material to another by direct contact.

  • Constant Coil Spring Balance System – Device for holding vertically sliding sash in any desired position through the use of a spring or weight to counterbalance the weight of the sash.

  • Convection – Heat transfer by currents that flow from a warm surface to a colder one.

  • Coved Exterior – An arced extension from the frame that adds an aesthetically-pleasing dimension to the exterior of the window.

  • Dead-air Space – The space between the panes of glass of an I.G. unit.

  • Deadlite – A piece of glass or I.G. unit with a sash profile around it; not set within the main frame of a window unit.

  • Denny Clip™ Pivot System – An exclusive hinge-type system used on hung windows. This system attaches the sash to the balance, creating perfect alignment between the sash and frame while allowing the sash to tilt inward for cleaning.

  • Double Hung – A window that has two operable sashes which slide vertically.

  • Double-strength Glass – Glass with a thickness of approximately 1/8″.

  • Egress Code – The code that requires a minimum opening of a window for persons to exit or firefighters to enter a building.

  • Extruded Screen Frame– Different from a Rollformed frame, this frame is pressed through a form or die.

  • Fusion-welded – The process of joining materials by melting them together with extreme heat (over 500ºF), resulting in the materials uniting into a one-piece unit.

  • Geometric – Specially designed windows classified as either Straight line Geometrics such as rectangles, triangles, trapezoid, octagons, pentagons, etc., or Radius Geometrics which include Half-rounds, Quarter-rounds, Circles, Ellipses, Eyebrows, etc.

  • Glass – An inorganic transparent material composed of sand (silica), soda (sodium bicarbonate), and lime (calcium carbonate) with small quantities of alumina, boric or magnesia oxides. Available Styles: clear, bronze tinted and grey tinted.

  • Glazing – The process of sealing the glass to the sash.

  • Grids – Decorative horizontal or vertical bars installed between the glass panes to create the appearance of the sash being dividing into smaller lights of glass.

  • Head – The horizontal top portion of the main frame.

  • Hopper – A window with a bottom-hinged sash that opens inward for ventilation.

  • I.G. Unit (Insulating Glass Unit) – Two or more lights of glass separated by a spacer and hermetically sealed at the glass edges.

  • Intercept®Spacer System– Spacer system using a U-channel design to reduce the number of conduction paths.

  • J-channel – Integral extension on the outside of a new construction window that eases installation on siding applications.

  • Jamb – Vertical sections of the main frame.

  • Keeper Rail – The horizontal section of the sash where the keeper is attached.

  • Keeper Stile – The vertical section of the sash where the keeper is attached.

  • Krypton Gas – An inert, odorless, colorless, tasteless, non-toxic gas which is about 12 times denser than air. It is used to replace air between the glass panes to reduce temperature transfer and deter convection.

  • Laminated Glass – Specially designed glass where two panes of glass are bonded to a durable interlayer, providing increased safety, UV protection and noise reduction. If the window or door gets broken the glass will adhere to the to the plastic interlayer-preventing glass fallout in the home.

  • Lap-Lok®Meeting Rail– A patented meeting rail which overlaps and interlocks both sashes.

  • Lift Handle – A handhold for raising and lowering the sash. Handle implies that the handhold is not continuous across the sash.

  • Lift Rail – A handhold for raising and lowering the sash. Rail implies that the handhold is continuous across the sash.

  • Lite – A unit of glass in a window.

  • Lock Rail – The horizontal section of the sash where the cam lock is attached.

  • Lock Stile – The vertical section of the sash where the cam lock is attached.

  • Low E (Emissivity) Glass – Glass with a transparent metallic oxide coating applied onto or into a glass surface. The coating allows short-wave energy to pass through but reflects long-wave infrared energy which improves the U-value.

  • Main Frame – The head, sill and jambs sections of a window.

  • Mechanically Fastened Frame – Refers to frames fastened with screws.

  • Meeting Rail – The horizontal sections of a pair of the sash that meet when the sash is closed.

  • Meeting Stile – The vertical section of a pair of the sash that meets when the sash is closed.

  • Mesh – Fabric made of either fiberglass or aluminum, used in the making of screens.

  • Mullion – A vertical or horizontal connecting unit between two or more windows.

  • Nailing Fin – An extrusion attached to the main frame of a window used to secure the unit to the rough opening.

  • Obscure Glass – Glass that has been made translucent instead of transparent.

  • Oriel – A window with the meeting rail located off center of the frame. Most oriels have a 60/40 configuration.

  • Overlapping and Interlocking Meeting Rail – A patented meeting rail which overlaps and interlocks both sashes.

  • Patio Door – A glass door that slides open and closes on adjustable tandem rollers. Available in 2- or 3-lite configurations with the operable panel available in any position.

  • Picture – A window that has no moveable sash.

  • Pivot Alignment System – An exclusive hinge-type system used on hung windows. This system attaches the sash to the balance, creating perfect alignment between the sash and frame, while allowing the sash to tilt inward for cleaning.

  • Power Seal Spacer System™ or True-dual Seal – A high-performance spacer system based on four independent designs featuring a U-channel Intercept spacer dual-sealed with a urethane adhesive and a hot melt butyl and an additional desiccant matrix within the spacer cavity.

  • Pull Handle – A handhold for sliding the sash back and forth. Handle implies that the handhold is not continuous across the sash.

  • Pull rail – A handhold for sliding the sash back and forth. Rail implies that the handhold is continuous across the sash.

  • Pull Stile – A handhold for sliding the sash back and forth. Stile implies that the handhold is continuous across the sash. 

  • R-value – Resistance a material has to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the resistance. 

  • Rail – The horizontal sections of the sash. 

  • Raised Exterior – An angled extension from the frame that adds an aesthetically pleasing dimension to the exterior of the window.

  • Relative Humidity Condensation Point – The relative humidity level at which visible water vapor or other liquid vapor begins to form on the surface of the sash or frame, based on an inside temperature of 70° F and an outside temperature of 0° F. The higher the percentage, the more moisture the air can hold before condensation will occur.

  • Rollformed Screen Frame – A method of fabrication in which a flat (usually metal) material is placed on a machine where the material is formed into shape using differently shaped rollers and pressure.

  • Sash – The part of the window which contains the glass.

  • Shading Coefficient – The ratio of solar heat that is transferred through a glazing material relative to the solar heat transferred through 1/8″ clear glass. The lower the number the more efficient the window is at reducing solar heat gain.

  • Sill – The horizontal, bottom section of the main frame.

  • Simonton Sill® – An exclusive triple-stepped, sloped sill design.

  • Single Hung – A window in which one sash slides vertically and the other sash is fixed.

  • Single-strength Glass – Glass with a thickness of approximately 3/32″.

  • Slider Window – A window in which the sash move horizontally. Sliders are available in a 2- or 3-lite configuration, with the 3-lite having operable end vents.

  • Sloped sill – The sill of the window that has a downward slope to the outside. This sill has sufficient degree of slope to aid in water runoff.

  • Solar Heat Gain Coefficient – The percentage of heat gained from both direct sunlight and absorbed heat. The smaller the number, the greater the ability to reduce solar heat gain.

  • Spacer – Material placed between two or more pieces of glass in order to maintain a uniform width between the glass, and prevent sealant distortion.

  • Stepped Sill – An exclusive triple-stepped, sloped sill design.

  • Stile – The vertical sections of the sash.

  • Stucco Fin – An extrusion used in stucco home installations that are attached to the main frame to create a smooth, finished look for both the window and the stucco.

  • Tape Glazing – Two-sided tape used to secure and seal the glass to the sash.

  • Tempered Glass – Glass with a surface compression of not less than 10,000 psi, or an edge compression of not less than 9,700 psi. When broken, the glass breaks into pebbles instead of shards.

  • Tilt Latch – Mechanism that unlocks the sash and allows it to tilt in from the mainframe.

  • Tilt-in/lift-out Sash – A sash that can be tilted to the interior and removed for cleaning and is manufactured by welding.

  • U-value – Amount of heat transferred through a material. The lower the U-value, the slower the rate of heat flow and the better the insulating quality.

  • UV Block – The percent of ultraviolet rays blocked from being transmitted through the glass. The higher the number the lower the percentage of ultraviolet rays transmitted through the window.

  • Visible Light Transmittance – The percentage of light that is transmitted through the glass in the visible light spectrum (380 to 720 nanometers). The higher the number the higher the percentage of visible light transmitted through the window.

  • Weatherstripping – Material used to form a weather-resistant seal around operable sash.

  • Weep Slots – Slots or holes in the sill (bottom) member of the sash frame that allows water to escape. Weep flaps add a vinyl flap to keep insects out.

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